CONGRESS AND FOREIGN POLICY: LITTLE INITIATIVE, MUCH REACTION-DYNAMICS AND A PARAMETERS OF INSTITUTIONAL CONFLICT

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Gerald L. Houseman

Abstract

The American Congress competes with the Presidency and the Executive Branch for powers and prerogatives of foreign policy-making, and it persists in this despite a number of disadvantages imposed by recent historical trends. The President has traditionally held the upper hand in international matters because of the constitutional roles of Chief Executive, Chief Diplomat, and Commander-in-Chief of the military.  These roles have been strengthened by television, the nuclear age, and a public which despairs of understanding the complexities of foreign affairs.  By the large, the Executive Branch is given great leeway in foreign policy-making not only because of its traditional position of authority, but because present-day conditions often require quick and decisive responses. A parliamentary body like Congress is ill-equipped for these tasks (copied from the paper).

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How to Cite
L. HOUSEMAN, Gerald. CONGRESS AND FOREIGN POLICY: LITTLE INITIATIVE, MUCH REACTION-DYNAMICS AND A PARAMETERS OF INSTITUTIONAL CONFLICT. JATI - JOURNAL OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES, [S.l.], v. 5, p. 79-84, dec. 2000. ISSN 2600-8653. Available at: <https://jati.um.edu.my/article/view/6492>. Date accessed: 21 aug. 2019.
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