THE LIVED EXPERIENCES OF MARRIED HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT STUDENTS IN A PHILIPPINE STATE UNIVERSITY: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

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Solomon D. Faller

Abstract

A college degree has always been linked with success.  This is the usual answer by people from underdeveloped countries like the Philippines. For Filipinos, finishing college is the most effective antidote to poverty, and parents consider it a precious dowry for their children. This phenomenological case study, using semi-structured interviews, reveals the transformative effect of a college degree upon the life prospects of young, married, millennial students.  Their narratives   illustrate the complex balancing between school life as students and family life as fathers and mothers.  They tell an interesting story of pushing efforts of adapting family life to the needs of schooling.  This specific case study shows how inclusive education can be supported by government authorities   achieve socio-economic development goals.


 


Keywords: college degree, college life, married millennial students, phenomenological study

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How to Cite
FALLER, Solomon D.. THE LIVED EXPERIENCES OF MARRIED HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT STUDENTS IN A PHILIPPINE STATE UNIVERSITY: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY. JATI - JOURNAL OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES, [S.l.], v. 24, n. 1, p. 173-193, june 2019. ISSN 2600-8653. Available at: <https://jati.um.edu.my/article/view/18673>. Date accessed: 20 nov. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.22452/jati.vol24no1.8.
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